Samuel Quinto Trio: Salsa’ N Jazz

Samuel Quinto Trio - Salsa N Jazz

There is something about this new Brasilian-born pianist, Samuel Quinto that strikes a vibrant chord in the inner ear. Perhaps it has to do with his wonderful grasp of the joy that abounds in the Brasilian northeast… his sense of “alegria.” Perhaps it also has to do with his mature approach, wonderful use of dynamics, his expression and his innate ability to allow the tonal center of his music to shine. He has an exquisite ear and his hands are independently controlled by his mind that separates melody and harmony when required. Quinto, as a result, makes his fingers tingle on the keys, rumble and guffaw and cry with chords from which he wrings laughter and sadness and pure joy.

On Salsa’ N Jazz he plays with primal hypnotic rhythm calling out to the roots of his music that reach the deepest Africa, via the folksy corners of Brasil and Spain – which means the nooks and crannies of the Mediterranean of the Mid East, India and Europe. The result is a record on which these cultures come together in a flash point that warms the blood of the soul. His playing is muscular and intuitive and smacks of an artist who likes to invent on the fly, to constantly evolve.

At the starting point of Quinto’s playing is also a deep symbiotic relationship with forró in all its vibrant glory – “baiao”, “xote” and “arrasta-pe” – all elegantly captured and twinkling when his fingers touch the ebony and ivory. The most joyous and memorable display of this is his interpretation of Victor Young’s “Stella by Starlight,” which is given a rousing forró treatment and reaches fever pitch as the choruses of the song unravel. It pays to mention that on this song – as on the others on this record – Brasilian bassist, Marcos Borges and Cuban drummer, Manuel Santiesteban shine with their wonderful interplay.

Samuel Quinto is also an accomplished composer and shows maturity and a sense of adventure with the rhythmic variety that he presents here. A rumba: “Quinto’s Rhumba,” which incidentally is played in a delightfully chopped style reminiscent of Thelonious Monk. “Jaci” is an exciting, dancing song that crosses Cuban rhythms with a hint of Brasil. “Bolero To Preta,” a loving sketch of the pianist’s mother suggests that he has plenty of inner clave. “Ficou No Meio” is simply wonderful forró that turns giddy as Quinto, Borges and Santiesteban rumple the harmony and rhythm gloriously. “Kalimba Mulêle” rumbles in the deepest African rhythms. “Vôo Da Andorinha” is a chorinho that, quite simply, reveals Quinto’s “Alma de Nordeste.” And “Isabel (Para Você)” is a beautiful ballad that glitters and glimmers as its emotional tonal colors begin to unfold.

“Salsa’ N Jazz” is a flagship song that captures all that is unforgettable about this record: A pianist with the ability to dazzle quietly as right hand flies exotically and left hand constantly invents harmony and rhythm. Here is a pianist of great promise – who carries with him his rich Brasilian tradition and indeed all Latin America into an exciting new musical landscape.

Tracks: Quinto’s Rhumba; Jaci; Bolero To Preta; Salsa’ N Jazz; Ficou No Meio; Kalimba Mulêle; Isabel (Para Você); Vôo Da Andorinha; Stella By Starlight.

Personnel: Samuel Quinto: piano; Marcos Borges: bass; Manuel Santiesteban: drums.

Label: Independent
Release date: August 2009
Buy Samuel Quinto’s music: amazon

Raul Da Gama
Based in Milton, Ontario, Canada, Raul is a poet, musician and an accomplished critic whose profound analysis is reinforced by his deep understanding of music, technically as well as historically.

More from author

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

Related posts

FROM OUR VINYL STOREspot_img
FROM OUR VINYL STOREspot_img

Featured Posts

Celebrating Jane Bunnett: Spirits of Havana’s 30th Anniversary

After dark they gather, the spirits of Havana. Is that a ghostly, but fatback-toned rapping down in the barrio where the great composer and...

Piazzolla Cien Años: Lord of the Tango@100

There is a now famous photograph of the great Ástor Piazzolla that is iconic for so many reasons. Chief among them is the manner...

Omara Portuondo, Multifaceted Gem of Cuban Music

My moon app announces that in 14 hours the Supermoon of May will be here. During a full moon I often get inspired to...

Ray Barretto · Barretto Power

Barretto Power: A Celebratory Reissue on its 50th Anniversary It was 1970 when Fania Records released Barretto Power, one of a series of seminal albums...

El Gran Fellové: Part 3- When my Parents…

When my parents bought their home in 1968, Sunset Beach was just another sleepy little beach town It spanned about one mile in length, sandwiched...

El Gran Fellové: Part 2- Enter Chocolate & Celio González

Early Sunday morning… I awoke to the pleasant surprise of a Google Alert in my email. I clicked to find Variety Magazine had published an...

El Gran Fellové: Part 1- The Beginning

Francisco Fellové Valdés (October 7, 1923 – February 15, 2013), also known as El Gran Fellové (The Great Fellove), was a Cuban songwriter and...

Bobby Paunetto, New York City and The Synthesis of Music

Bobby Paunetto was an unforgettable composer, arranger, musician and recording artist. Latin Jazz Network honors him on the tenth anniversary of his death (8.10.10). His...

Jazz Plaza 2020: Ancient to the Future

Chapter four of our series: 35th Jazz Plaza International Festival in Havana In recent months I found myself in profound reflection of the term...

Ray Martinez and the Forgotten Legacy of Jazz

Sometime in the very near future, several of the jazz world's best known writers and musicologists will meet in some obscure conclave to pool...

Join our mailing list

Participate in contests, giveaways and more