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Brasilian Report

Mario Adnet – More Jobim Jazz (Adventure Music – 2011)

Of all the musicians who have contributed to keeping the repertoire of great Brazilian composers alive, Mario Adnet may be making the greatest contribution here. Like trombonist Roswell Rudd, soprano saxophonist Steve Lacy and pianist Misha Mengleberg who gone to great lengths to keep the music of the great pianist and composer Herbie Nichols’ and (to a certain extent) Thelonious Monk’s repertoire alive, the guitarist Adnet has created some of […]

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Review written by: Raul da Gama

Of all the musicians who have contributed to keeping the repertoire of great Brazilian composers alive, Mario Adnet may be making the greatest contribution here. Like trombonist Roswell Rudd, soprano saxophonist Steve Lacy and pianist Misha Mengleberg who gone to great lengths to keep the music of the great pianist and composer Herbie Nichols’ and (to a certain extent) Thelonious Monk’s repertoire alive, the guitarist Adnet has created some of the finest repertory albums of Brazilian music. His work to preserve and spread the music of Moacir Santos, ranks among the finest albums of Brazilian music to have been released as is his album of Baden Powell music and of course his Jobim Jazz album. To these he has now added More Jobim Jazz, another exquisite album produced by the Adventure label of Richard Zirinsky Jr. and Mike Marshall.

Mario Adnet may well be one of the finest living orchestrators in contemporary musical idioms outside what is still catalogued as classical music. He combines the skill of Gil Evans in his use of woodwinds and brass, with a stylish use of strings and percussion and although he has not written much for truly large ensembles he is easily the peer of the Duke, or at least the Duke Ellington of small and medium sized Brazilian ensembles. His elegant taste and his marvelous sense of colours and shades puts him in a secure place where the only other reigning musicians are The Duke, Gil Evans and George Russell. He has a sensibility that makes him to small ensembles what Respighi is to the large world of classical music. Such is his extraordinarily sharp ear for timbre and for the tonal spectrum of the instruments in the brass, woodwinds and certainly strings as well and it seems only a matter of time before he uses the larger family of strings—violins, violoncellos and multiple basses.

On More Jobim Jazz Adnet seems to have tapped into the soul of Jobim, just as he did before. Here, however he is more assured than ever before. This is evident from the sure-footed manner in which he has paced the music, using tempi that are marginally quicker than the Master himself. “Wave” is a wonderful example. On lesser-known Jobim charts such as “Samba de Maria Luiza” “Marina Del Ray” he uses sixteenth notes to colour his harmonies with the most subtle hues. And in “Deus e o Diabo Do Sol” his masterful use of color and nuanced shades turns the melodic narrative into something of a masterful and visually exciting medieval battle. This he repeats in his re-creation of Gershwin’s “Rhapsody in Blue” as he introduces Jobim’s beautiful “Samba do Avião”. The superb work of the trombones has much to do with this and it bodes well for the earthy energy of new Brazilian masters of the instrument, Everson Moraes and Vittor Santos.

Mario Adnet says he discovered the link between Gerry Mulligan’s Tentet and Quartet from 1953. If he goes on listening to the cool surfing sounds of the 50s West Coast, heaven knows what he will come up with next!

Track Listing: 1. Takatanga; 2. Mojave; 3. Boto (Porpoise); 4. Bonita; 5. Antigua; 6. O Homem (The Man); 7. Ai Quem Me Dera (I Wish); 8. O Barbinha Branca (The Little White Bearded Man); 9. Samba de Maria Luiza (Maria Luiza’s Samba); 10. Wave; 11. Marina Del Ray; 12. Deau e o Diabo Na Terra Do Sol (God and the Devil in the Land of the Sun); 13. Samba do Avião (Song of the Jet) (intro: Rhapsody in Blue by George Gershwin).

Personnel: Andrea Ernest Dias: flute (4, 6, 8, 10, 11, 13); Joana Adnet: clarinet (2, 8, 9 – 11, 13); Zé Canuto: alto saxophone (1, 3 – 9, 11, 12); Marcelo Martins: tenor saxophone (1 – 5, 8 – 13); Henrique Band: baritone saxophone (1, 3, 4, 6, 7, 9, 10, 12, 13); Philip Doyle: French horn (1, 3, 5, 6, 10 – 13); Jessé Sadoc: trumpet (1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 12), flugelhorn (2, 10); Aquiles Moraes: trumpet (9), flugelhorn (11, 13); Everson Moraes: trombone (1 – 3, 5, 6, 8, 10 – 13); Vittor Santos: trombone (6, 9, 10 – 13); Mario Adnet: acoustic guitar (1 – 6, 10, 11, 13); Antonia Adnet: acoustic guitar (7 – 9); Ricardo Silveira: electric guitar: 4, 5, 8, 10, 12); Marcos Nimrichter: piano (1, 2, 4 – 10, 12, 13), accordion (3, 7, 8); Jorge Helder: acoustic bass (1 – 10, 12, 13); Jurim Moreira: drums (1 – 3, 6, 12); Raphael Barata: drums (4, 5, 7 – 10, 13), Armando Marçal: percussion (1 – 3, 6, 12).

Related links: Mario Adnet on the web: www.marioadnet.com

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Brasilian Report

Rique Pantoja: Live in Los Angeles

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Rique Pantoja

The West Coast of the United States has had a rather long – and celebrated – association with the music of Brasil. Rique Pantoja is tapping into the Brasilliance on his Live in Los Angeles album. Moacir Santos created by far the greatest series music when he moved to Pasadena, California from Brasil in 1967. He quickly began turning heads with his spectacular take on the lineage of the [post bebop] cool, melding it with the music of his home-state, Pernambuco, in his very singular mix of other dance forms from Brasil. Other influential Brasilian musicians whose artistry collided with West Coast Cool were Cesar Camargo Mariano, Airto and Flora Purim [when she was there once upon a time] to name a few Brasilians who influenced the North American West Coast sound.

Rique Pantoja: Live in Los Angeles
Rique Pantoja: Live in Los Angeles

Rique Pantoja, by virtue of his extraordinary musicianship, his long-limbed compositions that seem to roll along with their exquisite, naturally danceable rhythms, can also lay claim to this august line of musicians. His music, captured on this beautifully-recorded album seems to express the sheer joy – the alegria – of being alive and in love. The composer [and pianist] seems to indulge fully his predisposition for dreamscapes as he is on stage, allowing the lyrical saxophonist [and flutist] Steve Tavaglione to stretch and take extraordinary melodic and harmonic excursions with winding, lyrical lines of his own seemingly intoxicated by the enraptured emotions ensconced in the music.

The pianist’s poetic fantasies – such as we listen to on “Da Baiana” – evoke images of voluptuous eloquence in the form of a sultry, baiana, rhythmically hip-swishing her way down along fine white sand of the Coconut Coast in Bahia. With rippling keyboard grooves, Mr Pantoja conjures vivid, lifelike imagery of surf beating around us, while Mr Tavaglione’s flute, with cascading lines from the guitar of Ricardo Silveira wail and moan and whistle melodically. Meanwhile the percussionist – Cassio Duarte – and drummer Joel Taylor – re-create the sizzle and steamy seduction of baiana’s rolling rhythm along with the deep rumble of the bass played with extraordinary facility by Jimmy Earl.

“Arpoador” is one of the finest songs on the album that had already mesmerised the audience with its tintinnabulation of the keyboards introducing the opening strains of Mr Pantoja’s magical and mystical song. Even under the Brasilliance of “1000 Watts” the audience seems to be under the hypnotic spell of the music from then on… a spell that is only broken when Rique Pantoja and this marvelous ensemble gently awaken them with the balladic – and balletic – aural dreamscape of “Pra Lili”, to close a beautiful set that offers an astonishing insight into Mr Pantoja’s artistic conception.

Tracks – 1: Arpoador; 2: Julinho; 3: 1000 Watts; 4: Da Baiana; 5: Bebop Kid; 6: Que Loucura; 7: Morena; 8: Pra Lili

Musicians – Ricardo Silveira: guitar; Steve Tavaglione: saxophones and flute; Rique Pantoja: keyboards and vocals; Jimmy Earl: bass; Joel Taylor: drums; Cassio Duarte: percussion

Released – 2022
Label – Moondo Music [MDO-2022
Runtime – 1:08:13

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