Artist Profile · Afro Peruvian Jazz Orchestra

Afro Peruvian Jazz Orchestra is a 20-piece ensemble that specializes in Afro Peruvian music. The band combines elements of Jazz and traditional Peruvian rhythms which result in fresh sounds and creative new melodies.

APJO was created by Anibal Seminario and Lorenzo Ferrero, both Peruvian composers/woodwind players. The music performed by the band is both original material and original arrangements of traditional Peruvian tunes. Some of the traditional rhythms enveloped within the performances are Landó, Festejo, Marinera, Zamacueca, and many others.

On January 4th, 2018, the APJO was invited to perform at the Jazz Education Network Conference, one of the biggest Jazz conferences in the world. In addition on May 5th, the APJO headlined and performed at El Camino College’s 5th annual Jazz Festival.

APJO debuted its first album, Tradiciones, in 2020, advocating the marvelous culture and influential music of Perú. This debut album has captured the hearts of many around the world, receiving two Latin Grammy nominations, one for Best Latin Jazz/Jazz Album, and one for Best Arrangement for the track “La Flor de la Canela,” a vals criollo song composed by legendary Peruvian singer-songwriter Chabuca Granda, and beautifully arranged by Lorenzo Ferrero. The Afro Peruvian Jazz Orchestra won the Latin Grammy for Best Arrangement. Tradiciones also received a nomination for the 63rd edition of the Grammy Awards, Best Latin Jazz Album category.

Founders and Music Directors

Lorenzo Ferrero and Anibal Seminario met in Lima, Perú while performing with the Peruvian National Youth Symphony Orchestra. Both classical clarinet players at the time, were immediate friends and started building a music relationship like no other.

Lorenzo later moved to Boston to study at Berklee School of Music, while Anibal moved to Los Angeles to study at the California State University of Long Beach. Once both concluded their studies, Lorenzo decided to move to Los Angeles, it is during this crucial time that both Anibal and Lorenzo knew exactly what to do. The idea of having an Afro Peruvian big band had always been lurking around and now in the city of Los Angeles, that idea has become a reality.

Web Editor
Latin Jazz Network is a project dedicated to the advancement of Latin jazz and its creators. Since 2000 LJN has been spreading the word about this wonderful music known under the umbrella term: LATIN JAZZ.

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