JAM: 112 Ways To Celebrate Jazz

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Attend a concert by your local high school or college jazz band.

Listen to a jazz CD that is new to you. Try to stretch your ears. If you need some guidance, try The Penguin Guide to Jazz on CD, 4th edition, by Richard Cook and Brian Morton, Tom Piazza’s Guide to Classic Recorded Jazz.

Read a good book on jazz.

Find a new jazz website.

Listen to a radio station that plays genuine jazz.

Go to “This Date in Jazz History” (at www.SmithsonianJazz.org), pick an anniversary, and go out find some music by that musician to explore.

Pay a pilgrimage to your favorite jazz city, or to a jazz museum, or to a musician’s birthplace or gravesite.

View Satchmo, Jazz on a Summer’s Day, Straight No Chaser, or another jazz documentary or performance video.

Check out the jazz offerings or find your local NPR station, on the web site www.npr.jazz.org.

Log onto a distant jazz radio station on the web. For example, KLON (www.klon.org), WBGO (www.wbgo.org), or WWOZ (www.wwoz.org) which features New Orleans music.

If you travel in the United States, use The Da Capo Jazz and Blues Lover’s Guide to the U.S., by Christiane Bird, as your guide to jazz clubs and historical locations in 25 cities.

Join your local jazz society. If none exists, organize one.

Subscribe to a jazz magazines, such as Down Beat, Jazz Times, Jazziz.

Host jazz listening sessions in your home.

Hold a jazz-themed party in honor of a favorite musician, or to celebrate jazz in general.

Read a jazz-related poem–such as those in The Jazz Poetry Anthology, edited by Sascha Feinstein and Yusef Komunyakaa or their The Second Set: The Jazz Poetry Anthology, Vol. 2.

Consider a jazz-related artwork (such as those reproduced in Seeing Jazz: Artists and Writers on Jazz, compiled by the Smithsonian Institution’s Marquette Folley-Cooper, Deborah Macanic, and Janice O’Neil.)

*Source: smithsonianjazz.org | See full list here

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